The sgENGAGE Podcast Episode 172: Federal Data Privacy Legislation

November 25, 2020 sgENGAGE Team

With only a little more than a month left for the the 116th U.S. Congress, there is still federal data privacy legislation pending that could affect social good organizations. So, what’s included in those bills and how exactly might your organization be affected if they are passed?

Today’s episode features experts Sally Ehrenfried, who leads government relations at Blackbaud, and Cameron Stoll, Blackbaud’s Director of Privacy. In this session originally hosted at bbcon 2020, Sally and Cameron discuss the current landscape of data privacy legislation in the U.S., the key committees and lawmakers involved in federal data privacy legislation, and where current legislation stands.

Topics Discussed in This Episode:

  • The federal data privacy legislation landscape
  • Key committees and lawmakers involved in federal data privacy legislation
  • Whether legislation will contain limitations on changing your privacy policy
  • The principle of consent
  • Examples of data use that don’t require consent
  • The Brookings Institution compromise
  • The impact the election might have on federal data privacy legislation

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Listen Now:

Resources:

Cameron Stoll

Sally Ehrenfried

bbcon

The sgENGAGE Podcast Episode 112: Tips for a Successful Hill Day

The sgENGAGE Podcast Episode 110: Understanding Data Privacy Regulations

 

Quotes:

“When we’re looking at what happens to a federal bill, and with California having such a large delegation, their delegation can actually have an impact on whether a bill passes or not, especially in light of how it treats CCPA.” –Sally Ehrenfried

“The information has to be presented in a way that’s concise, transparent, intelligent, and easily accessible to the data subjects, using clear and plain language.” –Cameron Stoll

“The GDPR was really the first law to give individuals choice about processing their data on the basis of consent.” –Cameron Stoll

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